EMAIL Me

Have a question about my books, my blog, or just want to get in touch? I'd love to hear from you!

Name *
Name


Macungie, PA 18062

Website of author and professional editor Rachelle M. N. Shaw. Find information about her books, her editing services, and her blog, From Mind to Paper: On Writing and Editing.

header original pic.JPG

Writing Craft Series

This nonfiction series about the craft of writing (title TBA) covers the various stages of creating a bestselling fiction piece, including planning, drafting, editing, and publishing. It's filled with tips for becoming a better writer and strategies for tackling those tricky tropes and clichés. Do you have trouble creating multi-layered characters? Are you stuck in the editing stage and don't know where to go next? Those questions and more will be answered in this four-part series.

Why Nonfiction?

Although they are two very different types of writing, I have a passion for writing both fiction and nonfiction—something that has led me to my career of being a professional editor. My bookshelves are lined with everything from the Harry Potter series and other fantasy books to ones on editing, typography, design, and web coding. My brain has been wired to go in two different directions for as long as I can remember. Writing nonfiction was a natural fit for me, allowing me to mesh art with more technical pieces.

The root in my decision to create a nonfiction series on the craft of writing partly stems from the overwhelming response I have had to my blog, particularly The Grammar Grind and The Editing Agenda series. The positive feedback I received from those and many of my other posts motivated me to create a book series that would help others with their craft of fiction. There will be four books in total, one on each stage of the writing process. I have title in place for the series (TBA) and am currently in the midst of drafting the first book.

Writing Craft Series: Book 1

The first book will cover planning and the initial drafting stage for manuscripts. In a previous blog post of mine, 10 Reasons Every Fiction Writer Should Learn Technical Writing, I cover a bit about my past experience as a technical writer and how that had shaped my ideas about writing fiction. In the book, I'll be expanding upon each idea covered in the blog post, and I'll be putting a fresh spin on some common writing advice, such as know your audience and write what you know. Not all advice is good adviceI'll discuss which ideas have some merit and which ones you should kick to the curb.